Wednesday
12 Oct 2016
The Working Nepali Tour

Ready to discover some hidden spots of the Kathmandu valley? This trip takes you off the beaten track to meet the locals on the only day off during the week; Saturday. I (Tiphaine Texier) was lucky to be part of the experience to see how lifestyle changes in the suburban areas of Kathmandu Valley.

First stop was Khokana, a little village at the foot of the mountains. The surroundings are so green after the monsoon and landscape thereafter!

We walk around the village, meeting the women doing the laundry by hand and giving their kids a bath. People are outside, enjoying the sun and the peaceful, beautiful Saturday morning. Kids are playing; some men are worshipping in the tiny Hindu and Buddhist temples.

Everything is perfectly normal: the goats, chicken and dogs in the streets, the chili drying at the windows. Along the narrow streets, we visit a Sari workshop: three women are busy sewing and creating one of those amazing clothes. As we keep walking among the rice fields, we arrive in Bungamati, another charming village. Here is located a beautiful Hindu temple, apparently very important for the area. Some devotees are singing and walking around the temple playing devotional music.

Then it’s lunch time! We enter a very local restaurant. Lunch is ready with a very fresh and delicious dal bhat (traditional Nepali dish made of rice and lentils). What a great lunchtime! We are sitting here, enjoying the food and the company of people we didn’t know in the morning and we might not see again. Living in moment, without thinking about yesterday or tomorrow. Experience of mindfulness!

Next stop is center for disabled children of different kind of handicap; a very emotional meeting. Some are blind, deaf, physically challenged… But all of them have an energy that you can feel all around you. It is a powerful moment. Then we meet the coordinator of the place, a gentleman shining like the sun! I trust him at instantly. He is incredibly dedicated to the kids and their disability. He is learning Braille, a Nepalese sign language and pathologies in books, as he doesn’t have a proper education.

  • Tags: Nepal, outdoor, Local